how to build tools worm compost sifter final assembly wire

How to Make a Worm Compost Sifter

DISCLAIMER: THIS IS NOT A NEW IDEA. IN FACT, IT’S A BUILD OF A COMPOST SIFTER I SAW HERE:
http://www.abc.net.au/gardening/stories/s4561569.htm

Simply put, it’s three second-hand bicycle rims screwed to some batons and mounted onto a frame that sits on top of a wheelbarrow. You load up the cylinder with compost and as you spin the cylinder smaller bits of compost ready to go on the garden fall through the wire mesh. Larger bits are deposited out the end for further composting.

Costa’s video is straightforward and easy to follow. In need of more detail, I have undertaken the build and recorded it here in my own worm compost sifter.

WARNING: I have a year 8 pass in woodworking, so some of the steps can probably be done better! Also, be careful with the tools kids and use the appropriate safety gear.

The compost sifter is ideally used as a faster way to sort worms from worm compost. The 6mm wire I eventually used, should be small enough to stop worms dropping through into the finished vermicompost. However, some smaller worms and also cocoons in the worm compost will fall through the wire. You can either sort through the sifted worm compost to retrieve the worms or leave them where they are.

A more thorough sorting method is to take the finished worm compost and place it under a light source. Worms are photovores and will naturally burrow towards the centre of the pile. After giving the worms ten to twenty minutes to burrow begin scraping the worm compost away. It should be devoid of worms or only have a few slow coaches left behind.

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A high schooler’s knowledge of woodwork? What could possibly go wrong?

Checkout Page Two – Tools used
Checkout Page Thee – Build instructions

Adam
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Adam

Chief Worm Wrangler at The Gentleman Vermiculturist
Adam Jones is the Gentleman Vermiculturist. He lives in the suburb of Dingley Village with his wife, two kids, dog, cat and, according to his wife, an alarming number of worms. He uses email and can be contacted at adam@thegentlemanvermiculturist.com.au.
The Gentleman Vermiculturist can be found on Facebook and Instagram as well as other social media. He talks incessantly about worms.
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